Post #23: Bloomsbury Heads West

I’m a longtime reader of Seven Days, our local weekly here in Burlington.  It’s the go-to spot for local politics, music, art, food, and occasionally, fiction.  This is all to say that I’m beyond excited to have a short story in this week’s edition.  It’s a story called “Bloomsbury Heads West,” kind of a strange little story, actually, and one that I’ve long been fond of and am glad it’s found a home.   There’s also a great piece of art by Stefan Bumbeck created to accompany the piece.

Special thanks to Margot Harrison and Pamela Polston for selecting the story and sheperding it to publication.

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4 responses to “Post #23: Bloomsbury Heads West

  1. Congratulations Benjamin!
    All the best, Sharon

  2. Benjamin,
    Your terrific story came to my attention & that of many other Woolfophiles at the Virginia Woolf blog: http://bloggingwoolf.wordpress.com/2011/12/28/woolf-and-the-gang-in-the-american-west/
    Because of my particular interest in the way contemporary writers have used Woolf’s image, life & work, I’d love to know how you came up with this idea, why Woolf &c.
    Best wishes & good luck with your novel…

    • Hi ALice…thanks so much for reaching out and I’m honored that you enjoyed the story and that it was mentioned on the Virginia Woolf blog. My interest in Virginia Woolf goes back to my mother, who was a Bloomsbury fanatic for a time and become particularly intrigued not only Woolf, but especially with Dora Carrington. Then, in college, I encountered Mrs. Dalloway, which I adored, and later read letters and journals and developed my own fascination with Virginia Woolf, who I saw as a both triumphant and tragic figure. I can also remember seeing and loving The Hours, which broadened my sense of her. I can also credit a colleague of mine who is a Woolf fanatic. The idea to have a rural farm wife turn into the great Victorian just came to me one day and seemed like it might make a wild premise for a story that, if executed right, might work. Initially, I saw it as a humorous conceit–the contrast between the American farmer and the proper Victorian–but in revision the story took on a life of its own and began showing me other things it wanted to say. I had a blast working on it.

      I most appreciate your interest.

      Best,
      Benjamin

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